A Thousand Cuts (2020)

  • 1h 50m
  • Ramona Diaz
  • United States
  • 2020


SCREENING TIMES:
—————————–
Fri 12 Jun, 8pm
Sat 4 Jul, 11am


“Gripping… impressive… engrossing… harrowing… essential.”

What would be the result if you put Trump’s malignant narcissism together with Putin’s callously vicious vindictiveness, into the moral vacuum that is Britain’s Johnson, added some seasoning in the form of the Brazilian Bolsonaro’s arrogant self-entitlement, and switched on the blender?

The sludge that would emerge would probably resemble the present president of the Philippines, Eduardo Duterte — if it was topped off with an attitude in which the poor are regarded as vermin to be eliminated.

Fortunately for us, there are journalists of extraordinary courage around the world willing to challenge these macho men, certainly risking their freedom, and possibly also their lives, in the battle for press freedom and against persecution of media. In particular, the Philippines is blessed with such a woman, a woman possessing extraordinary Intelligence, integrity and, most of all, courage — Maria Ressa.

“Ressa’s seemingly boundless energy,
good humour and intelligence
make her a power plant
for the manufacture of inspiration in embattled times.”

— Jessica Kiang, Variety

Ressa founded Rappler, an organisation of mostly female journalists, in order to speak truth to power, loudly, lest freedoms die by “a thousand cuts”. Rappler’s work exposes the roots of Duterte’s campaign of violence, and also of his manipulation of social media, his lies and corruption. Unsurprisingly, harassment and imprisonment follow.

While Ressa is director Ramona Diaz’s main protagonist, she also spends time with pro-Duterte figures, thereby demonstrating that it is when autocratic leaders somehow capture the zeitgeist that they become truly deadly.

But the film takes time to laugh, as Ressa does, and celebrates the good in this world, reminding us that it is precisely because life can be so beautiful that we need to combat tyrants like Duterte. We must make ourselves heard. Thankfully, women like Maria Ressa are with us to lead and inspire us along this path.


Previous festival selections include:
Sundance
SXSW
Hot Docs


Director

Ramona Diaz

Language(s)

Tagalog, Filipino, English